Food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA)

How much have you read or heard about food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis (FDEIA)? Perhaps this is the first time you hear about this condition. This is one of the reasons I always keep my Epipen on me. One would not want to find themselves without it in a time of need.

With FDEIA; “the patient may go through life eating the food they are allergic to without any reaction, and it’s only when they exercise afterwards that the anaphylaxis strikes.”

I highly recommend having a read through the article below, to hear about a young mans’ reaction.

To read more, go to: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2197842/Going-jog-Dancing-Or-just-doing-gardening–How-taking-exercise-trigger-deadly-food-allergy.html#ixzz261SAazOm

Cookbook Giveaway from our friends at Allergy Free Alaska!

Have a look at Allergy Free Alaska’ website, link below, to enter for a chance to win “Nourishing Meals”! And while you are on the site, browse their recipes and resources. :-)

Good luck with the Giveaway!

http://www.allergyfreealaska.com/2012/09/06/a-cookbook-review-of-nourishing-meals-and-a-giveaway/

Have you become a better cook as a result of having food allergies?

If you are anything like me, having severe food allergies and sensitivities has made me healthier. Living with allergies has made me much more aware of what I eat. I must say, most of the credit can go to my soy allergy as it seems like there are preservatives in almost everything these days! The soy allergy has kept me far away from any processed foods and cold-cuts at the deli as well as the marinated meats and most sauces you would find at the local grocery store. As a result, I have  spent a fair bit of time looking up recipes, getting ideas from others and trying new ingredients that I had never heard of before, and hadn’t the slightest clue how to pronounce!

I absolutely LOVE to be in the kitchen and try new recipes and spice blends. The aroma in the kitchen when cooking curry, or when a tasty soup is on low and simmering is AMAZING! Preparing the vegetables is usually a little time consuming, however it is always worthwhile. There is nothing like a home cooked meal! And all of ours are just that. If you don’t cook much and the idea of cooking more from scratch seems like one that is not going to happen, I highly recommend sitting down, brainstorming a list of the meals you enjoy most and the “comfort food” meals. Then, have a look online, as there are so many variations and some a lot easier than others! Finding recipes from someone who lives with allergies, or even a gluten-free diet is an added bonus, as they will likely have suggestions for substitutions and such ( ie: milk, eggs ).

A few sites I really like for recipes are;

My Gluten-Free Goddess

All Recipes

Living Without

Allergic Living

I learned how to cook fairly young and am very thankful to my parents and grandparents for that. If there’s one thing I would recommend, it would be to teach your kids how to cook. :)

If you are eating out with food allergies, one of my best tips is to keep it simple! Remember, the more different ingredients in the meal you order, the more risk. This is just something I have learned through experience. I’ve would also rather eat out with friends and socialize over a simple dish so I am not fearing a reaction. In my mind, there’s no point in risking it. However some restaurants, you might feel confident that they have you covered and truly “get it” and in these situations you might be more confident trying something different. I have asked for fancier dishes in a few restaurants where I had a really good talk with the manager and chef and felt confident that they were being as careful as they could possibly be in the kitchen to avoid cross-contamination. More on this train of thought to come in another post!

And, if you are interested here is an article about just this topic; “How Food Allergies Have Made Me a Better Cook”

“May Contain” Statements

Anaphylaxis Canada just shared a new poll

“Do you / does your child eat products with a “may contain (allergen)” statement?” .Answer the poll, and see what others had to say

Buying “clean” food in Victoria and Online!

If you are like me and strive to find products that have the least possible amount of preservatives in them as possible, I highly recommend browsing through Epicure to see what amazing herb mixes and products you can find.

“Epicure does not add filler, additives or MSG to their products. We make it possible for people with allergies to enjoy tasty food without compromising their health! Contact me for specific information about our products or ingredients. Most of our products are gluten free, low in salt, and BC certified Kosher.” – Tricia Sturgeon, Independent Consultant

And while you are at it, check out my most recent page with local places to buy! Lifestyle Markets, Market on Yates, and Market on Millstream are the first few I had time to add =)

Where to Eat out in Victoria, BC

Check out the “Resources” tab as I will be adding more local businesses to this tab over the next few days. If you live in Victoria, there are many great options for eating Gluten-free and great stores to shop at. As always, I can only post about what I know, so if you’ve been to another restaurant or cafe that has wheat-free or gluten-free options, please share! :-)

Tips for teens when eating out, a short article I wrote..

A short Article I wrote for the AAIA in 2007… from the following link on the Allergy/Asthma Information Associations website: http://aaia.ca/en/tips_for_teens_when_eating_out.htm

Tips for Teens When Eating Out

by Erika Ladouceur, Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, QC

There are a number of different ways of approaching different situations from eating out, to going to a friend’s house etc. These are a couple things I keep in mind when I eat out. Precautions are a good thing.

  • If you or an adult is calling the restaurant ahead of time for a reservation, you might want to mention your allergy then. This way the staff/chef will know in advance and possibly set up a meal for you and if not, they will be more prepared when you go for supper etc. (Less to worry about the night of, especially if it’s a birthday party or celebration.)
  • Make sure that you carry your epinephrine auto-injector with you.
  • When you arrive at the restaurant, you can mention to the waitress who is serving you about your allergies, so it doesn’t come up at the same time as all the other orders. (Simply means the waitress is more likely to find out from the chef immediately because he/she doesn’t have to place other orders etc. You have their attention…)
  • Make sure you use the words “fatal” or “deadly” or “anaphylactic” when specifying your allergy. This will have a bigger impact then if you simply say: “I have an allergy to peanuts…” They will be more likely to understand the situation better.
  • Ask for sauces or salad dressings on the side… That way if you see you can’t have the dressing or sauce, you won’t have to return the entire meal. They can just give you vinegar or oil or something else.
  • When in doubt STAY AWAY! If you don’t think something is safe even though the waiter or waitress seems to think it’s ok, avoid it. We know and understand our allergies as well as the foods that usually contain them..
  • Double check, even if you have been told prior that the food is safe.
  • Stay calm if you’re not feeling right, but tell someone right away even if you’re not sure if it really is relevant.

There are a number of different ways of approaching different situations from eating out, to going to a friend’s house etc. These are a couple things I keep in mind when I eat out. Precautions are a good thing…