Where can “Priority Allergens” be found?

 

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On Friday I shared a post about soybeans and 2 places I really did not expect I would find them – ink and pillows. This morning I thought I would share some information shared on Anaphylaxis Canada’s website about “priority allergens”, also known as food allergens identified as being the most common, based on Canadian food labelling requirements.

Here are the 10 “priority allergens”:

  • Eggs
  • Milk
  • Mustard
  • Peanuts
  • Seafood (fish, crustaceans, shellfish)
  • Sesame
  • Soy
  • Sulphites
  • Tree Nuts
  • Wheat

Anaphylaxis Canada – Priority Food Allergens

Anaphylaxis Canada has clearly outlined other names, possible sources and non-food sources for the different food allergens. Though the lists are not exhaustive, they are a great place to start if you are curious where some of these food allergens can be hidden.

Have a look and let us all know in the comments if anything surprised you. Are there other sources you have found for any of the 10 food allergens listed above that are not on Anaphylaxis Canada’s website?

Teen dating with food allergies

“I think the big things for adolescents are really around dating with food allergies”

Interview around dating for teens by Lynn Desjardins from Radio Canada International. Be sure to listen to the recorded interview at the bottom of the page! 🙂

Kissing with Allergies – RCI

Livingwithallergies is in the news!

A terrific article in The Province by Lauren La Rose with the Canadian Press. Just in time for Valentines Day

@ WhyRiskIt, Anaphylaxis Canada, Sloane Miller

Communication, planning can help ease dating anxiety for people with food allergies

 

Victoria Allergy and Asthma Fair! A success.

Today was the Allergy and Asthma Fair organized by “Protecting Anaphylactic Children Today“. There was a great turnout to this event held at the Esquimalt Recreation Center this afternoon. There were speakers as well as several booths set up with resources and treats. Sara Shannon spoke as well as a Ministry of Health 811 Dietician and an Ambulance Paramedic.

Some of the local companies included Crumsby’s Cupcake Cafe, The Market on Millstream and The Market on Yates, Dare Foods, Epicure Selections.

Many of us challenged each other with our spirometry results which was great fun, all thanks to the VIHA Respiratory Health team!

The information booths included:

Allergies Abroad
Health Canada
Asthma Society of Canada & National Asthma Patient Alliance
Allergic Living Magazine
Anaphylaxis Canada
Allergy/Asthma Information Association (AAIA)

If you joined us today, what did you think? Did you return home with some new resources and perhaps new ideas on how to manage either your allergies and/or a loved ones?

Feel free to share comments here!

“May Contain” Statements

Anaphylaxis Canada just shared a new poll

“Do you / does your child eat products with a “may contain (allergen)” statement?” .Answer the poll, and see what others had to say

There’s still time to sign up!

Does your child have asthma and or anaphylaxis? Are they between 7 and 15 years of age? Here’s an opportunity you most definitely won’t want them to miss out on! After 2 pilot studies the University of Alberta Social Support Research Program and Anaphylaxis Canada and several others, are launching a full scale 8 week online program, lead by Investigator; Dr. Miriam Stewart.

“Based on [the] comments, from parents after the pilot study, the answer is an overwhelming “Yes!” Yes, this study is a worthy investment of your limited time! Yes, your son/daughter will want to participate” – SOS website Kids Want to Attend

By week 8 your child will be wishing there were more sessions. It’s the perfect opportunity for them to talk, share, laugh and make new friends from across the country who they might actually share an awful lot in common with! Check out there site https://sites.google.com/a/ualberta.ca/sos/project-definition

If you have any questions, please feel free to email me! I was a mentor in both pilot interventions and am always excited to discuss. I know as a mentor, I learned a lot from the children and youth and had an amazing experience. Great people, a fun time and so much to take away with you after the fact! Even some role playing. =)

Willing to share your story?

Have you ever had an anaphylactic reaction? The Youth Anaphylaxis Panel in conjunction with Anaphylaxis Canada have a special section on their website dedicated to opening up the floor for sharing. Perhaps someone will learn from reading your story, or become more cautious about the dangers of cross-contamination. There are many stories on their “Reaction Registry” http://www.whyriskit.ca/pages/en/resources/reaction-registry/browse-reaction-registry.php

Even if you don’t feel like sharing yours, it’s a great place to skim through a few stories of youth and young adults who have been through similar events as you. Their site also has great resources for youth, including podcasts and videos! From dating to dining out and travelling with food allergies.

It’s all about community and awareness. 🙂